Asthma Statistics

United States

General/Diagnosis
• The number of people with asthma continues to grow. One in 12 people (about 25 million, or 8% of the U.S. population) had asthma in 2009, compared with 1 in 14 (about 20 million, or 7%) in 2001.
• More than half (53%) of people with asthma had an asthma attack in 2008. More children (57%) than adults (51%) had an attack. 185 children and 3,262 adults died from asthma in 2007.
• About 1 in 10 children (10%) had asthma and 1 in 12 adults (8%) had asthma in 2009. Women were more likely than men and boys more likely than girls to have asthma.
• In 2010, 3 out of 5 children who have asthma had one or more asthma attacks in the previous 12 months.
• For the period 2008–2010, asthma prevalence was higher among children than adults.
• In 2008 less than half of people with asthma reported being taught how to avoid triggers. Almost half (48%) of adults who were taught how to avoid triggers did not follow most of this advice.
• About 1 in 9 (11%) non-Hispanic blacks of all ages and about 1 in 6 (17%) of non-Hispanic black children had asthma in 2009, the highest rate among racial/ethnic groups.
• For the period 2008–2010, asthma prevalence was higher among multiple-race, black, and American Indian or Alaska Native persons than white persons.
• From 2001 through 2009 asthma rates rose the most among black children, almost a 50% increase.
• From 2001 through 2009, the greatest rise in asthma rates was among black children (almost a 50% increase).

Costs
• Asthma cost the US about $3,300 per person with asthma each year from 2002 to 2007 in medical expenses, missed school and work days, and early deaths.
• Asthma costs in the US grew from about $53 billion in 2002 to about $56 billion in 2007, about a 6% increase.
• More than half (59%) of children and one-third (33%) of adults who had an asthma attack missed school or work because of asthma in 2008. On average, in 2008 children missed 4 days of school and adults missed 5 days of work because of asthma.

Health Care Visits/Hospital
• In 2008, asthma hospitalizations were 1.5 times higher among female than male patients.
• From 2001 to 2009, health care visits for asthma per 100 persons with asthma declined in primary care settings, while asthma emergency department visit and hospitalization rates were stable.
• For the period 2007–2009, black persons had higher rates for asthma emergency department visits and hospitalizations per 100 persons with asthma than white persons, and a higher asthma death rate per 1,000 persons with asthma. Compared with adults, children had higher rates for asthma primary care and emergency department visits, similar hospitalization rates, and lower death rates.

Morbidity Rates
• More than half (53%) of people with asthma had an asthma attack in 2008. More children (57%) than adults (51%) had an attack. 185 children and 3,262 adults died from asthma in 2007.
• Asthma was linked to 3,447 deaths (about 9 per day) in 2007.

International

• The prevalence of asthma in different countries varies widely, but the disparity is narrowing due to rising prevalence in low and middle income countries and plateauing in high income countries.
• An estimated 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, with 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease.
• It is estimated that the number of people with asthma will grow by more than 100 million by 2025.
• Workplace conditions, such as exposure to fumes, gases or dust, are responsible for 11% of asthma cases worldwide.
• About 70% of asthmatics also have allergies.
• Approximately 250,000 people die prematurely each year from asthma. Almost all of these deaths are avoidable.
• Occupational asthma contributes significantly to the global burden of asthma, since the condition accounts for approximately 15% of asthma amongst adults.
References
1. World Health Organization. Global surveillance, prevention and control of chronic respiratory diseases: a comprehensive approach, 2007.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Vital Signs, May 2011.
3. World Allergy Organization (WAO) White Book on Allergy, 2011.
4. National Hospital Discharge Survey, Mortality Component of the National Vital Statistics System, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC, 2011.
5. Trends in Asthma Prevalence, Health Care, and Mortality in the United States, 2001-2010, CDC, May 2012.
6. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012. Washington, DC: U.S.

Asthma Overview

Asthma is a chronic disease involving the airways in the lungs. These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to come in and out of the lungs.

If you have asthma your airways are always inflamed. They become even more swollen and the muscles around the airways can tighten when something triggers your symptoms. This makes it difficult for air to move in and out of the lungs, causing symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and/or chest tightness.

For many asthma sufferers, timing of these symptoms is closely related to physical activity. And, some otherwise healthy people can develop asthma symptoms only when exercising. This is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), or exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Staying active is an important way to stay healthy, so asthma shouldn’t keep you on the sidelines. Your physician can develop a management plan to keep your symptoms under control before, during and after physicial activity.

People with a family history of allergies or asthma are more prone to developing asthma. Many people with asthma also have allergies. This is called allergic asthma.
Occupational asthma is caused by inhaling fumes, gases, dust or other potentially harmful substances while on the job.

Childhood asthma impacts millions of children and their families. In fact, the majority of children who develop asthma do so before the age of five.

There is no cure for asthma, but once it is properly diagnosed and a treatment plan is in place you will be able to manage your condition, and your quality of life will improve.

An allergist / immunologist is the best qualified physician in diagnosing and treating asthma. With the help of your allergist, you can take control of your condition and participate in normal activities.

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Common Asthma Meds May Raise Sleep Apnea Risk

Common Asthma Meds May Raise Sleep Apnea Risk, Study Says

Preliminary finding saw possible link between certain inhaler drugs and the sleep disorder, but more research needed

WebMD News from Health Day

By Kathleen Doheny

HealthDay Reporter

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FRIDAY, Feb. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Medicines commonly used to control asthma may increase the risk of a potentially serious sleep problem in some people, a small, early study suggests.

“Inhaled corticosteroids may predispose to sleep apnea in some asthma patients,” said study author Dr. Mihaela Teodorescu, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, in Madison.

In sleep apnea, breathing periodically stops during sleep, for a few seconds or even minutes at a time, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The pauses can occur as often as 30 times or more in a single hour. In the most common type of apnea, the airway becomes blocked or collapses during sleep. If untreated, apnea can increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and other problems.

However, the new study linking asthma medicines with an increased apnea risk was very small — including just 18 patients. And the researchers found a link, not cause and effect, and don’t yet know what that connection means.

An expert not involved in the study was skeptical of the findings, emphasizing that more work is needed.

The researchers monitored the men and women for changes in the “collapsibility” of their upper airways during sleep and their tongue function. Three patients had the amount of fat in their soft palates measured with MRIs, which found a redistribution of fat to the neck area, which can narrow the airway